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July 14, 2012
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How to Draw Realistic Guns, part 2 by Coonass How to Draw Realistic Guns, part 2 by Coonass
Part 1 of this tutorial can be found here: [link] these tutorials build on each other so you should probably read that one first.

Part 2 of my tutorial series on how to draw realistic firearms. In this section we continue to learn about the semi-automatic rifle. Focusing on the trigger group and operating group. I has also tried to include a section on external features (which might be just the slightest bit important to the discerning artist) but I ran out of room. So instead of condensing the section I'm going to release it as part of a exasperated mini tutorial, so look for that in the near future.

also, if you use this tutorial to improve your weapons drawings post links, I like to see how my tutorials improve people's work.
Other links:

Adams arm animation: [link]
POF USA animation: [link]
Trigger group animation: [link]
My marine corps themed webcomic (this is shameless self promotion): [link]
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:iconurbanshock:
UrbanShock Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2014  Student Interface Designer
Wonderful!
Reply
:iconvicariouslygaming:
VicariouslyGaming Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2014  Student Digital Artist
This is great! Maybe a little misleading in the title, but I've been needing a nice reference for safeties and such, Thanks!
Reply
:iconkittenbutler:
KittenButler Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Its good for a gun "anatomy" but its not really HOW TO DRAW GUNS
Reply
:iconthelegacyofk41z3r:
TheLegacyOfK41Z3R Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2013
Ikr..?
Reply
:iconaaapi:
aaapi Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2013
you never did upload a part 3 :c
Reply
:iconlonewolfassassin:
LoneWolfAssassin Featured By Owner Dec 12, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
great for people who don't know who guns really work c:
Reply
:iconkerdajan:
kerDajan Featured By Owner Aug 6, 2012
Genius! I've been looking for something to help me design weapons that could actually exist instead of looking like a tacticool bag of crap with a trigger. Fits the bill just fine, look forward to any future expansion
Reply
:iconpyrotactick:
Pyrotactick Featured By Owner Jul 21, 2012
OHH MAAH GOD.....*was brain****ed by this*, it's like a whole other world...
Reply
:iconlycan-rising:
lycan-rising Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
Very informative, good work.
Reply
:iconextraintelligence:
Extraintelligence Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
This is a good tutorial. Do you plan on making a tutorial for how pin-fire weapons work? (Weapons like bolt actions and the Glock series pistols.)
Reply
:iconcoonass:
Coonass Featured By Owner Jul 16, 2012
possible eventually, but not in the near future.
Reply
:icontounushi:
Tounushi Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2012
Should there be a point on the gas block placement? I read somewhere that the gas port needs to be about 2/3 of the way down the barrel, so it won't take too much gas or too little gas for its operation.
I noticed this when doing my latest rifle and I had to add a band on the barrel so it would function as an AN-94 style gas tube.
Reply
:iconcoonass:
Coonass Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2012
There's a lot or research and science that has focused on proper placement of the gas system. What they've found is that the closer the gas block is to the chamber, the higher pressure the gas will be. However, as long as the system can handle that pressure and still function reliably it's not generally an issue. As far as I've read there will never be too little gas to cycle the weapon. Rifles like the M1 Garand used to place the gas block almost at the muzzle. Meanwhile the M1 carbine placed it very close to the chamber (this type of system is known as a tappet). On AR-15 systems it was found that the ideal placement of the gas block is about 2/3 of the way down the barrel. However, AR-15 style SBRs have forced manufacturers to innovate, and reliable mid-length gas blocks have recently been developed. So, provided you can properly vent the gas and your system is robust enough to handle the pressure there is no proper placement for the gas block. In any case, as far as artists are concerned it really doesn't matter, and making an interesting design will generally take precedence over the length of the gas system.
Reply
:iconaaapi:
aaapi Featured By Owner Jul 14, 2012
I think you're forgetting the part about making the weapon modular.


In case a part of your gun stops working, you want to be able to quickly take the gun apart to fix whatever broke inside.

Having the rifle use a one-piece box for a receiver will make field-stripping impossible.

The simplest way to accomplish this would be to separate the receiver into two parts and have a takedown and pivot pin, as in the AR-15 series.

Another, slightly more complicated (for me) way is to have a large receiver with a small part on top, as in the AK series and the dust cover.


Tip that you might never address aside, this really is a great tutorial, and despite my research, I actually learned a couple new tricks here. For one, I never thought of the firing mechanism as a "T" though that is perfectly reasonable.

I also like how you clarified that people who refer to whole cartridges as "bullets" knew nothing of what they said and that those who called pistol magazines "clips" were idiots. :lol: After you're done with the tutorial, though, consider going back and completely rereading it if you ever find the time. I coulda sworn I passed at least five various errs in the two parts I've read. (yes, err is a word)
Reply
:iconcoonass:
Coonass Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2012
Your right that a tactical weapon should be field strippable, but were using the crawl walk run method here. Modularity and ease of field maintenance will come later. As for the receiver, I actually like one piece receivers where you pull the contents out the back (the M-249, DTA SRS, or the Israeli Tavor), as it has more integrity, but that's just me.
Reply
:iconaaapi:
aaapi Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2012
I often forget them, because the cleaning takes a few more minutes over a system where you just flip up, and everything is there (M60, AR)
Reply
:icontounushi:
Tounushi Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2012
Weapon modularity's more advanced studies. This is the bare-bones basics. Some artists fail even at that.
And a weapon doesn't really need to follow the AR-10/15 or AK style when it comes to receiver takedown. There's the CETME/G3 method as well, where the stock is what holds the moving components in the receiver.
Reply
:iconaaapi:
aaapi Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2012
Sometimes I fail to mention bullpup, because I suck at systems where the materials go in the stock.

Standard is always easier to describe for me.
Reply
:icontounushi:
Tounushi Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2012
I meant it this way: [link] not bullpup
Reply
:iconaaapi:
aaapi Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2012
Oh.

(never would have guessed such a system was even possible)
Reply
:icontounushi:
Tounushi Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2012
There are more rifle designs than AK-47 and M16.
Reply
:iconaaapi:
aaapi Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2012
I know that. I just forgot to include them.
Reply
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